The 30% Rule on Social

With the arrival of the internet, businesses now have the opportunity to reach customers around the globe. And, customers have endless purchase options.

Almost every market is now a global market.

To succeed in this era of the internet and connect with your market, of course it’s important to sell great stuff, deliver on time, and treat your customers like royalty… but there’s more to it than that. Being great at what you do is only about 70% of the equation.

To stand out, you need that extra 30%.

The extra 30% is what separates those who thrive online from those who struggle.

The extra 30% is about sharing not just what you do, but who you are.

Because, customers want to get to know you.

It builds trust and credibility.

To cut through the clutter in a world of options, customers need to see more than product specs and a slick website. They want stories, impromptu photos, and personality. They want to see the informal, non-business stuff. They want to get to know you and your team.

So, while 70% of what you say as a company is serious, important, and service-oriented, let 30% of your communication be relaxed and fun. Let 30% be pure entertainment.

And, this 30% is not optional on social media.

Because, that’s what social media is for, the personal stuff.

If you’re all business all the time on social, you will have a hard time finding traction and getting followers. Social media was invented for humans to connect with other humans (not for businesses to advertise to their market). Social media is meant to be casual and fun. So, let 30% of your communications be about you, your staff, what you had for breakfast, and how you spent your weekend.

Some companies think communication like this is silly and frivolous, but it’s an essential part of a strong marketing plan.

It’s good business sense.

It’s the smart strategy.

Let customers in on what goes on behind the scenes. Tell them a funny story. Share an imperfect picture. Show them who you are.

That’s what will be remembered online.

That’s what will allow you to stand out in the enormous slew of product and service options. That’s what will help customers engage with your content, share with their friends, give you feedback, and stick around for the long term. That’s the kind of stuff that gets people talking about you.

Relationship-building is more than offering great products and services. 

The age of the internet requires more.

To win the attention and loyalty of your audience, being the best is only 70% of the story.

You must include the other 30%.