How to Get the Attention of Every Customer

Do you ever wish there was one simple rule for enticing, attention-grabbing marketing?

I’ll tell you… it’s brutal honesty.

In order for your marketing to be fresh and original, it must contain loads of honesty.

Discuss what people REALLY think about your products, services, or industry. Identify the stereotypes, acknowledge the rumors, and dive into those subjects that make you uncomfortable.

Why do customers hesitate when buying from you? What are their concerns?

These are the topics you should be addressing in your marketing.

Here are a few examples:

Taco Bell

Taco Bell recently ran a campaign that addressed public concern for the quality of their meat. Rumors had spread that the meat served at Taco Bell was of the poorest quality, not fit to even be served as dog food (so I’ve heard…) Instead of trying to cover up these rumors, Taco Bell met these customer concerns head on.

In a lighthearted, informational ad campaign, Taco Bell cleared the air about its meat quality. By validating customer hesitations, Taco Bell earned the trust and respect of its patrons.

Domino’s

“You want to order pizza from DOMINO’S!?! Eww…”

As the pizza market transformed, Domino’s found itself at the bottom of the taste totem pole for many pizza-lovers. Sales were dropping and customer satisfaction was at an all-time low. So, Domino’s decided to refresh the menu with a new selection of specialty pizzas and new recipes for dough and sauce. The company released an ad campaign featuring their new fresh ingredients and new recipes.

The best part of the ads? They addressed real customer complaints about pizza quality and explained that they changed their recipes in response. They followed this with a challenge: “Give our new pizzas a try, and let us know what you think. If you don’t like the new recipes, pizza’s on us”

dominos

If you want to grab the attention of your customers, talk about what they REALLY think. Talk customers through their problems. Make yourself a participant of the discussion already going on surrounding your products, services, or industry.

Honest marketing is the loudest marketing.

Scared yet? This part of marketing often sends business owners reeling.

We fight so hard against our customer’s objections because our products and services really are great. We dismiss customer concerns as misinformed or foolish.

“If only they understood, we are here to help them. Buying our products will benefit their lives, what’s there to be unsure about?”

The truth is, the most powerful marketing messages are those that discuss real doubts and worries. Brave business owners address those issues, make an effort to fully understand them, and ease the concern.

Companies like Match.com and Weight Watchers feature testimonials in their ads of people who describe their hesitations and fears.

“I wasn’t sure if this program was right for me”, “I’ve tried online dating before, and it didn’t work out”

“I hate dieting”

“I love cheese, wine, and chocolate. I don’t want to give up everything I enjoy”

“I like going out to eat with friends”

Embrace your customer’s concerns. Let them know you understand where they’re coming from. Let satisfied customers talk about their journey from skeptical to satisfied. Be frank, brutally honest, and light-hearted. It is how you will grab a customer’s attention. Speak as they do and they will listen.

Do you have skeptical customers? What customer concerns can you embrace to make them feel more comfortable buying from you? I’d love to hear your story, leave a comment below!

Photo Credit: Charlene McBride

Stacy Rust

Stacy Rust is a writer, speaker, mentor, and business consultant who helps individuals spread their ideas, thoughts, and expertise to worldwide audiences. With a focus on marketing, creativity, and psychology, Stacy's mission is to help you create the impact you've always dreamed of.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

one + 9 =

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>